Success
beautycomesfromwithin
last online: <time class="timeago" datetime="1593963857" title="Jul 5, 2020 15:44">Jul 5, 2020 15:44</time>
Verified User (2 years, 3 months)
Long Term User
Shoutout0

Hi All,

I was just wondering how do you deal with bullies in a nursing workplace environment. I work in mental health nursing in the UK. I find that people are bullying me e.g. ward managers because they are intimidating me.

This open post was written |
Views: 22, Subscribers: 4 |
Leave a reply | Report Post

⇩ Zoom to bottom
Reciprocity (0)
Reciprocity
Since writing this post beautycomesfromwithin may have helped people, but has not within the last four (4) days.
Post Tags (5)
bullying, ward, managers, intimidating, nursing
Replies (7)
Nacthoman shade
(2 hours after post)
Quote this reply Report this reply to moderators

bullying is a real thing.. its wrong, very wrong

Workplace Bullying: What Would You Do?

Have you ever found yourself in a situation where someone near you was being bullied? Maybe it was a coworker you knew well. Or maybe one you didn’t. Did you feel prepared to know how to respond? What did you do? Or did you do anything?

It’s not easy to know how to respond. But one thing is certain, if you have some practical tools at your disposal when you find yourself in this situation, you’ll be better prepared to act.

What is Workplace Bullying?

Bullying may be done through actions, verbal comments and physical contact. It may include repeated occurrences or be demonstrated through a pattern of behavior that is intended to intimidate, humiliate, offend or degrade a specific individual or group of people. Bullying is a form of aggression and may be subtle or quite obvious. Examples include tampering with personal belongings or work equipment, spreading malicious rumors, intimidation and physical abuse, or the threat of physical violence.

Interfering with work, preventing work from getting done, or sabotaging projects are other ways bullying may occur. Examples include taking and hiding equipment or tools needed to perform the job and exclusion from meetings or emails that contain important information pertaining to the job.

According to the Workplace Bullying Institute, workplace bullying is “four times more common than either sexual harassment or racial discrimination on the job.” One of the reasons why workplace bullying may be more prevalent than sexual harassment and racial discrimination is that many workplaces do not provide education or awareness about bullying – and many don’t see it as a problem. People who are bullied may not know how to report it or even understand that they are being bullied. In order to provide increased awareness, many states are introducing workplace anti-bullying bills and the Society for Human Resources Management (SHRM) reported in 2018 that 29 states have introduced these bills. If these pass, employers and employees will hopefully be equipped with greater knowledge of what bullying is and how to identify and stop it.

Impact of Workplace Bullying
The negative impact of bullying affects both the target of bullying as well as the company.

Victims of bullying experience significant problems financially, mentally, and physically:

High levels of stress; post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
Financial problems due to missed work and medical appointments
Sleep disturbances
Depression
The company also suffers when bullying occurs:

Reduced productivity and motivation
Absenteeism
Increased use of sick time, health care claims and Leaves of Absence (LOA)
Increased risk of legal action and costly claims
Decreased morale
Increased turnover
What Can You Do?
Here are some concrete ideas of what you can do when you see someone being bullied.

Speak up. If you’re in a meeting and a coworker is repeatedly talked over by another, you can raise your hand and offer, “Before I speak, I think Sara may not have completed her thought. Sara, you want to finish that idea?” Or you could say, “I think Michael was really onto something. Michael, do you want to finish your thought from earlier?” Provide the opportunity for the target to speak.
Lend your support to the target. Seek out the target in private. You can provide support by simply indicating your agreement with their idea or by specifically stating you saw the bullying behavior and are willing to provide them with support.
Speak with the bully. If you feel comfortable, speak to the bully in private and share your observations that they often talk over Sara in meetings. Listen carefully to the bully’s response to determine if the bully is receptive to changing their behavior.
Report it. Remember you can report bullying behavior to whomever you feel comfortable. That could be to your Human Resources department, a manager or other leader, or using your company’s whistleblower hotline. The target of bullying may not feel comfortable reporting it. You don’t have to be the target to make a report.
Don’t assume or make judgments. Don’t spend time speculating about why someone bullied another. Any assumptions you make are just guesses and may be completely wrong. Instead, consider taking the actions discussed above, to the extent you feel comfortable.
Recommend awareness. Speak to your Human Resources department about providing training or meetings to bring forth awareness as to what bullying is and how to prevent it. Proactive measures will help others to identify bullying, know the steps to stop it and to better understand that bullying will not be tolerated.
In Summary
According to research from the University of Phoenix, 75% of employees have either been witness to or themselves the target of workplace bullying. Employers need to do more to provide education and awareness to the employees as well as define a process to handle bullying in an expeditious manner. By committing to providing a safe and healthy work environment for all, employers can commit to taking swift action to prevent bullying from entering the workplace.

Resources
75% Of Workers Are Affected By Bullying — Here’s What To Do About It by Christine Comaford, Forbes

Founded in 1997, the Workplace Bullying Institute is the first and only U.S. organization dedicated to the eradication of workplace bullying that combines help for individuals, research, books, public education, training for professionals-unions-employers, legislative advocacy, and consulting solutions for organizations.

Help me with:

the wicker man

Success
(6 hours after post)
Quote this reply Report this reply to moderators

NacthoMan wrote:
bullying is a real thing.. its wrong, very wrong

Workplace Bullying: What Would You Do?

Have you ever found yourself in a situation where someone near you was being bullied? Maybe it was a coworker you knew well. Or maybe one you didn’t. Did you feel prepared to know how to respond? What did you do? Or did you do anything?

It’s not easy to know how to respond. But one thing is certain, if you have some practical tools at your disposal when you find yourself in this situation, you’ll be better prepared to act.

What is Workplace Bullying?

Bullying may be done through actions, verbal comments and physical contact. It may include repeated occurrences or be demonstrated through a pattern of behavior that is intended to intimidate, humiliate, offend or degrade a specific individual or group of people. Bullying is a form of aggression and may be subtle or quite obvious. Examples include tampering with personal belongings or work equipment, spreading malicious rumors, intimidation and physical abuse, or the threat of physical violence.

Interfering with work, preventing work from getting done, or sabotaging projects are other ways bullying may occur. Examples include taking and hiding equipment or tools needed to perform the job and exclusion from meetings or emails that contain important information pertaining to the job.

According to the Workplace Bullying Institute, workplace bullying is “four times more common than either sexual harassment or racial discrimination on the job.” One of the reasons why workplace bullying may be more prevalent than sexual harassment and racial discrimination is that many workplaces do not provide education or awareness about bullying – and many don’t see it as a problem. People who are bullied may not know how to report it or even understand that they are being bullied. In order to provide increased awareness, many states are introducing workplace anti-bullying bills and the Society for Human Resources Management (SHRM) reported in 2018 that 29 states have introduced these bills. If these pass, employers and employees will hopefully be equipped with greater knowledge of what bullying is and how to identify and stop it.

Impact of Workplace Bullying
The negative impact of bullying affects both the target of bullying as well as the company.

Victims of bullying experience significant problems financially, mentally, and physically:

High levels of stress; post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
Financial problems due to missed work and medical appointments
Sleep disturbances
Depression
The company also suffers when bullying occurs:

Reduced productivity and motivation
Absenteeism
Increased use of sick time, health care claims and Leaves of Absence (LOA)
Increased risk of legal action and costly claims
Decreased morale
Increased turnover
What Can You Do?
Here are some concrete ideas of what you can do when you see someone being bullied.

Speak up. If you’re in a meeting and a coworker is repeatedly talked over by another, you can raise your hand and offer, “Before I speak, I think Sara may not have completed her thought. Sara, you want to finish that idea?” Or you could say, “I think Michael was really onto something. Michael, do you want to finish your thought from earlier?” Provide the opportunity for the target to speak.
Lend your support to the target. Seek out the target in private. You can provide support by simply indicating your agreement with their idea or by specifically stating you saw the bullying behavior and are willing to provide them with support.
Speak with the bully. If you feel comfortable, speak to the bully in private and share your observations that they often talk over Sara in meetings. Listen carefully to the bully’s response to determine if the bully is receptive to changing their behavior.
Report it. Remember you can report bullying behavior to whomever you feel comfortable. That could be to your Human Resources department, a manager or other leader, or using your company’s whistleblower hotline. The target of bullying may not feel comfortable reporting it. You don’t have to be the target to make a report.
Don’t assume or make judgments. Don’t spend time speculating about why someone bullied another. Any assumptions you make are just guesses and may be completely wrong. Instead, consider taking the actions discussed above, to the extent you feel comfortable.
Recommend awareness. Speak to your Human Resources department about providing training or meetings to bring forth awareness as to what bullying is and how to prevent it. Proactive measures will help others to identify bullying, know the steps to stop it and to better understand that bullying will not be tolerated.
In Summary
According to research from the University of Phoenix, 75% of employees have either been witness to or themselves the target of workplace bullying. Employers need to do more to provide education and awareness to the employees as well as define a process to handle bullying in an expeditious manner. By committing to providing a safe and healthy work environment for all, employers can commit to taking swift action to prevent bullying from entering the workplace.

Resources
75% Of Workers Are Affected By Bullying — Here’s What To Do About It by Christine Comaford, Forbes

Founded in 1997, the Workplace Bullying Institute is the first and only U.S. organization dedicated to the eradication of workplace bullying that combines help for individuals, research, books, public education, training for professionals-unions-employers, legislative advocacy, and consulting solutions for organizations.

I just wanted to say thank you for the detailed response. I really appreciate it. I knew one lady who was bullied but she didn't say anything until she left. I couldn't help her at all.

This guy just started on me. I've know him for two years. Passive aggressive. I've been documenting what he says to me on my Microsoft word journal. I spoke to my manager briefly about it. This bully was from a ward I previously worked on. Bully L (other ward managers) can be rude to anyone lower than him. He got promoted so quickly. I tried to speak to him about his behaviour but he walked off. I'm going to create a case on him about him and monitor what he does to me and raise it higher if he ever tries anything.

Success
(6 hours after post)
Quote this reply Report this reply to moderators

Thanks for the advice

Dr. ralph club zps9ornptsl
(2 days after post)
Quote this reply Report this reply to moderators

Can you give a detailed explanation of this bullying? I mean what exactly is it that these people are saying or doing to you? I mean if they are your managers it's their job to tell you what to do or to reprimand you if you are not doing things the way they expect you to.

Success
(2 days after post)
Quote this reply Report this reply to moderators

DocteurRalph wrote:
Can you give a detailed explanation of this bullying? I mean what exactly is it that these people are saying or doing to you? I mean if they are your managers it's their job to tell you what to do or to reprimand you if you are not doing things the way they expect you to.

No he is a manager at another ward but I've known him since he was a student. He got promoted and has been being rude to everyone. He didn't like how I was trying to give advice to one staff member and keeps on being passively aggressive towards me. Now I've kept my distance from him and don't say much to him so he backed off.

e.g telling me to back off when I was doing my job.

Shouting and being passively aggressive

Undermining my skills

I've spoken to my supervisor and I feel he is intimidated by me.

Img 2679
(2 weeks after post)
Quote this reply Report this reply to moderators

I'm in nursing school and I have heard "nurses eat their young" thrown around, so I looked it up. I guess there are a lot of nurses who hate their job/lives because they're burned out and bitter. One solution is get a better job or see if you can get more education/qualifications so they can't pick on you as easily. But what's better is just stick up for yourself better. Don't take crap from them, act COLDLY and say "no" when appropriate. I hope they leave you alone.

Success
(2 weeks after post)
Quote this reply Report this reply to moderators

verge wrote:
I'm in nursing school and I have heard "nurses eat their young" thrown around, so I looked it up. I guess there are a lot of nurses who hate their job/lives because they're burned out and bitter. One solution is get a better job or see if you can get more education/qualifications so they can't pick on you as easily. But what's better is just stick up for yourself better. Don't take crap from them, act COLDLY and say "no" when appropriate. I hope they leave you alone.

Thank you so much for your comment. I have kept my distance from him because we don't work in the same department. He has made comments to other staff members and they have shut him down. I am trying to level myself but I do need to move on from the place as I worked there for a long time. He is only a couple years older than me. I'm in my late 20s and he is in his early 30s. Thank again and I will be acting cold towards people who don't treat me with respect.

A
⇧ Zoom to top

Help-QA supports basic Markdown, emoji 😁, and tagging friends with @username!