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BuckingFastard(JN)
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Being 'green'.

Yesterday after shopping in our local supermarket, I was in the queue at the Check Out, and heard when the young cashier suggested to the much older lady that she should bring her own grocery bags, because plastic bags are not good for the environment.
The woman apologised to the young girl & then sighed, "We didn't have this 'green thing' back in my earlier days."
The young clerk responded, "That's our problem today. You folk didn't do enough to save our environment for future generations."
The older lady said "Ahh yes you're right -- our generation didn't have the "green thing" in its day." She sighed then continued:
Back then, we returned milk bottles, lemonade bottles & beer bottles to the shops. The shops then sent them back to the plant to be washed, sterilized & refilled, so those same bottles were used over & over, thus REALLY were recycled. But we didn't have the "green thing" back in our day.
Grocery stores put our groceries into brown paper bags that we reused for numerous things. Most memorable was the use of brown paper bags as book covers for our school books. This was to ensure that public property (the books provided for our use by the school) were not defaced by our scribblings. Then we were able to personalise our books on their brown paper bag/covers. But, too bad we didn't do the "green thing" back then.
I remember how we walked up stairs because we didn't have an escalator in every store or office building; walked to the grocery store & didn't climb into a 300-horsepower machine every time we had to go 200 yards.
. . . But she was right. We didn't have the "green thing" in our day.
Back then we washed the baby's nappies because we didn't have the throw away kind. We dried clothes on a line, not in an energy-gobbling machine burning up 220 volts. Wind & solar power really did dry our clothes back in our days. Kids got hand-me-down clothes from their brothers or sisters, not always brand-new clothing. . . . But that young lady is right; we didn't have the "green thing" back in our day.
Back then we had one radio, in the house -- not a TV in every room. And if anyone did own a TV, it had a small screen the size of a handkerchief (remember them?), not a screen the size of a football pitch. When cooking we blended & stirred by hand coz we didn't have electric machines to do everything for us. When we packaged a fragile item to send by post, we used layers of old newspapers to cushion it, not Styrofoam or plastic bubble wrap. Back then, we didn't fire up an engine and burn gasoline just to cut the lawn. We used a push mower that ran on human power. We exercised by working so we didn't need to go to a health club to run on treadmills that operate on electricity., , , , But she's right; we didn't have the "green thing" back then.
We drank from a tap or fountain when we were thirsty instead of using a cup or a plastic bottle every time we had a drink of water. We refilled writing pens with ink instead of buying a new pen, & we replaced the razor blade in a razor instead of throwing away the whole razor just because the blade got dull. But we didn't have the "green thing" back then. Back then, people took the bus & kids rode bikes to school or walked instead of turning their mothers into a 24-hour taxi service in the family's expensive car or van, which cost what a whole house did before the "green thing"..
Oh and we had one electrical outlet in a room, not an entire bank of sockets to power a dozen appliances. And we didn't need a computerized gadget to receive a signal beamed from satellites 23,000 miles out in space in order to find the nearest leisure park.
. . . . But it so sad this current generation laments how wasteful we old folks were just because we didn't have the "green thing" back then? . . . I think you should forward this on to another selfish old person who needs a lesson in conservation from some smart ***ass young person. .. ...
We don't like being old in the first place, so it doesn't take much to piss us off... Especially from a tattooed, multiple pierced smart ***ass who can't make change without the cash register telling them how much. ยฏ_(ใƒ„)_/ยฏ

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Since writing this post BuckingFastard(JN) may have helped people, but has not within the last four (4) days.
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Why NSFW and helpbot??

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Unmarked NSFW. Not sure what HelpBot's deal is. ๐Ÿคทโ€โ™‚๏ธ

Love the post though!
It's not the common folk that have caused these issues- it's the evolution and expansion of new technologies and less efficient methods- all for the sake of convenience and laziness. ๐Ÿ˜‚

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Thanks 160.

It is the newer generation that's wasting so much stuff.
But, the sun can only burn for so long.
Once it stops, the world ends.
No amount of recycling can do anything about that.

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Wow, really puts things into perspective. Nowadays it's some huge alternative lifestyle to create no waste, but it's just naturally how people used to live I guess! My grandparents grew up on a farm with not much and I always notice how well my granny reuses everything and makes such amazing compost. Makes me feel guilty for being liberal with paper towels...

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Great post B.F. Where I live grocery stores offer ordering online and free pickup. Your order comes in reusable bags which you get credit on when you bring them back on the next order.
Similarly, a u-pick-it farm lets you go into their fields to pick fruits and vegetables. Bring your own bag the price is reduced by one third.

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"Being Green" is a code phrase for destroy everything environmental at the highest possible expense to the consumer.
I remember the push to Recycle in the 80's. I also remember the push for environmental conservation. With every new mantra and every new chant it really seemed we were going backwards - because we were.
Specifically, in the world of plastics. Plastic, plastic, plastic.... Soda bottles were no longer made of glass. Shopping bags were no longer made of paper - and just not more than a few years ago, candy is no longer wrapped in an easy to tear wax paper. Now your candy bar comes in a Mylar wrapper that will outlive the very product it contained, up to several hundred years.
Who....in the hell....recycles....a candy wrapper? No one.
There is no such thing as better living through implement of plastics - the corporate giants have very large joy-joy, feel good departments that want you to get on board their train - like printer ink cartridge return - are you *******fucking serious??? For what? So they can save money by refilling a product of which they already charge murderous amounts of money for?
On a bit of a side note, there was a time when certain foods needed the preservatives that you see listed in the ingredients. We have lived in an age for quite sometime where a specific product will hit the shelf in less than a day of its manufacture - practically sold in less than 12 hours and consumed, literally, the very evening it was bought.
Either way, the foods we eat don't need the preservatives they contain NOR is the plastic container they come in justified.
Who remembers Avon and Amway? Haha! Well hang on to your hat, here comes the Tupperware lady! Lady, you're outta business - there are countless people who eat straight from the Store Deli, hot and cold foods alike, packaged in plastic containers that even rival Tupperware!
The funny thing is, people think nothing of throwing away those Deli containers instead of reusing them - who care about recycling, just reuse them.
What is a consumer? A consumer is the negative view of a customer by the corporate giants and industry. A consumer is a lazy, rich fat greasy pig.
As Customers go, we have failed to stand up when our integrity has been attacked. When we fail to fight this battle you become a consumer because that's how industry perceives you.
Inform the company that you have stopped buying their soda and candy bar and will continue not buying it until some of the old standards are brought back.
Yes, of course it's a nobel effort but the corporate branches aren't quivering at your threat - they already know that consumer pigs can't get on the same page (much less see the same thing if only for a moment), no... So it still works to their favor.
I believe if Customers can win ONE major battle against the corporate giants, we will finally get what we want. Otherwise, a corporation that has been fully abandoned by its consumers becomes out of business, and disgraced and rightfully so.

9109252
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Yeah, the older generation doesn't realize that maybe going green wasn't an option back in the day. On the other side, I can see this as an opportunity for the older generation to live a healthier future

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The silent generation were certainly more resourceful and less wasteful than later generations. They had to be after living through the Great Depression. My dad is at the cusp of that generation. (Literally he was born the very first year of the baby boomer generation - 1946.) He rips off pieces of paper towels to use, god forbid I use the air conditioning, and if thereโ€™s a way to reuse a grocery bag, heโ€™s found it. Iโ€™ve adapted a few of those things, but I could definitely be better.

Every single generation has its good and bad. That generation chose to dump their toxic waste into rivers and streams so ยฏ_(ใƒ„)_/ยฏ

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Neutra-The-SpaceWeaver wrote:
Yeah, the older generation doesn't realize that maybe going green wasn't an option back in the day. On the other side, I can see this as an opportunity for the older generation to live a healthier future

Odd. It would be nearly impossible to say what you have after having actually read the Post.
What "Older Generation" exactly are you referring to? The generation that was raised up on wood, paper, parchment, glass and iron...or....the generation raised up plastic, styrofoam and other petroleum related products?
I don't think you know the meaning of "green" as well as you think. ๐Ÿ‘‰ The chances are, every diaper that was cenched to the a$$ of your generation can still be found in an overseas dumpsite....
๐Ÿ‘ˆ
๐Ÿ‘‰ Meanwhile, the cloth diapers that graced my rear was laundered and in the end, found their way into dads garage where they were used for automotive rags - and those were burned when their purpose was completely finished.๐Ÿ‘ˆ

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Error wrote:

Neutra-The-SpaceWeaver wrote:
Yeah, the older generation doesn't realize that maybe going green wasn't an option back in the day. On the other side, I can see this as an opportunity for the older generation to live a healthier future

Odd. It would be nearly impossible to say what you have after having actually read the Post.
What "Older Generation" exactly are you referring to? The generation that was raised up on wood, paper, parchment, glass and iron...or....the generation raised up plastic, styrofoam and other petroleum related products?
I don't think you know the meaning of "green" as well as you think. The chances are, every diaper that was cenched to the a$$ of your generation can still be found in an overseas dumpsite....
Meanwhile, the cloth diapers that graced my rear was laundered and in the end, found their way into dads garage where they were used for automotive rags - and those were burned when their purpose was completely finished.

Hey hey hey, now, my generation didnโ€™t invent plastic or push it on anyone. Itโ€™s such a popular thing nowadays to hate on millennials but if you want to blame anyone, really, you should be blaming the baby boomer generation for that. I donโ€™t know why itโ€™s my fault that the baby boomers were wasteful and gave two *****shits about reusing/recycling.

Although I guess the blame game isnโ€™t exactly the most helpful thing to do.

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Araz wrote:
Hey hey hey, now, my generation didnโ€™t invent plastic or push it on anyone. Itโ€™s such a popular thing nowadays to hate on millennials but if you want to blame anyone, really, you should be blaming the baby boomer generation for that. I donโ€™t know why itโ€™s my fault that the baby boomers were wasteful and gave two *****shits about reusing/recycling.

Although I guess the blame game isnโ€™t exactly the most helpful thing to do.

First (and let me be clear) I'm not hating "on" or "blaming" anyone.

Secondly, my statement was an argument from position, and this is where the confusion seems to be setting in. Has no one ACTUALLY READ J.N.'s Post??????? How about my original follow-up which supports her statement??????
If you (meaning anyone) read the Post and understood it in it's original context, anyone would not get the impression that the older generation is (or was) as wasteful as what the younger generation has been led to believe.
I find this misrepresentation to vilify a certain Westerized generation that grew up with abundance, rather deplorable, in the face of real contrast. I mostly blame this on the brainwashing, guilt-tripping and shaming by liberalized educators who want you to believe that we should apologize for the fruits of our labor and greatness.
Abundance does not necessarily equate to waste.

Through every successive generation, everyone does what they can with what they've got....up until recently, that is....

We live in an age where big industry and big corporations largely determine the habits of the masses. Corporations may be made up of compartmentalized individuals but they are not "people." They are "Entities." As such, they are responsible for just about every reprehensible thing done to humanity and the environment imaginable - and these corporate Entities live long. They have seen generations come and go.
These corporations spend billions of dollars to control their image among the public. They also love seeing the human race implode among itself, where generation blames generation.
....It seems to work.

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I wrote this long response and then deleted it because who cares, people listen to formulate their own responses, not comprehend, honestly it doesnโ€™t really matter what I think in the grand scheme of things anyways.

Electric
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Araz wrote:
I wrote this long response and then deleted it because who cares, people listen to formulate their own responses, not comprehend, honestly it doesnโ€™t really matter what I think in the grand scheme of things anyways.

....(sigh)....

9109252
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Error wrote:

Neutra-The-SpaceWeaver wrote:
Yeah, the older generation doesn't realize that maybe going green wasn't an option back in the day. On the other side, I can see this as an opportunity for the older generation to live a healthier future

Odd. It would be nearly impossible to say what you have after having actually read the Post.
What "Older Generation" exactly are you referring to? The generation that was raised up on wood, paper, parchment, glass and iron...or....the generation raised up plastic, styrofoam and other petroleum related products?
I don't think you know the meaning of "green" as well as you think. The chances are, every diaper that was cenched to the a$$ of your generation can still be found in an overseas dumpsite....
Meanwhile, the cloth diapers that graced my rear was laundered and in the end, found their way into dads garage where they were used for automotive rags - and those were burned when their purpose was completely finished.

You've never seen older country folks from back in the day. They have those old ways of thinking, 'I've been doing...for...years, I'm not changing' while they don't bother to give anything a shot. Lol, I spent over 25 years living in a forest, and spent my time on campus recycling, not to mention I use to write articles and cover stories about different groups cleaning up communities and replacing old materials to better the environment, I'm pretty sure I know what going green is.

Now, those diapers you mentioned floating in the sea (which aren't even my generation, lol), yeah you said they may not be as disposable as a 'cloth' diaper. What you didn't say was how garbage, such as those diapers are collected and refurbished into other materials that help our society today. You know, there's an entire park out here that's made completely out of recycled trash. Children play there daily, it's a skate park, exercise area, events are hosted there, and there are two man-made ponds around it. If I list the materials we use here that are from recycled material, we'd be here all day, but my point is anyone can go green, including the people from way back.

Araz wrote:
I wrote this long response and then deleted it because who cares, people listen to formulate their own responses, not comprehend, honestly it doesnโ€™t really matter what I think in the grand scheme of things anyways.

I agree, but it's not just you, it's everyone. Just because you can't convince someone of something doesn't make the outcome any different:/

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Yeah I was being overly sensitive when I wrote that.

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Neutra wrote:
You've never seen older country folks from back in the day. They have those old ways of thinking, 'I've been doing...for...years, I'm not changing' while they don't bother to give anything a shot.

Your persistence for missing the point makes you as guilty as "the old folks" who won't change their ways.
Again, for the ๐Ÿ‘‰ FOURTH ๐Ÿ‘ˆ time, no one can read the original Post for its intent and continue to vilify the older generation as 'destroyers of the environment.' The only way you can do this is to carry on as you have been doing and ignore the meaning of the Post altogether.

Just because you can't convince someone of something doesn't make the outcome any different

Boy! That's a fact I've been trying to establish here, over and over!

And then this:

Neutra wrote:
Lol, I spent over 25 years living in a forest -

Really? Me too! The difference is, I lived over 40 years in that forest to see time pave a road right to my front door.
The underlying reason for your stay in the woods seem to be driven by political activism, like a school-child playing Tarzan in the jungle.
It has nothing to do with setting yourself aside from the human race to find your place in the balance of nature. You are not a genuine naturist, but an activist and no one is required to come play with you (hence your games of 'green.')

Neutra wrote:
- and spent my time on campus recycling, not to mention I use to write articles and cover stories about different groups cleaning up communities and replacing old materials to better the environment, I'm pretty sure I know what going green is.

As someone who worked more than 25 years in commercial and residential construction, I am glad to hear you were safe behind your word processor writing about these things while I was disposing of whole buildings with lead paint, asbestos insulation, radon emissions and other toxic substances - I think I would be healthier today if I had wrote about these things too..... You know the funny thing about cleaning up a site is, ultimately, you just put the trash somewhere else.... So, until you begin to deal with toxic waste on its own terms...."going green" is just play time for adults who still have a junior-high feel good mentality.

Neutra wrote:
Now, those diapers you mentioned floating in the sea (which aren't even my generation, lol), ๐Ÿ‘‰yeah you said they may not be as disposable as a 'cloth' diaper.๐Ÿ‘ˆ

Did I say that? No, I did not say that. Your lazy journalism is so magnificently convoluted that I cannot help but devote some time and precision and make you my special project, to correct your errors.
First: The diapers floating in the sea may not be from your generation but the ones in the g*dd*a.m. landfill are.....
Second: by virtue of what a cloth diaper is, a cloth diaper is meant to be used and reused over and over. This means when the baby poo-poo's in the cloth diaper, it must be washed and dried.
Did you know that for all of human history that's the way it was? The idea that a diaper was meant to be made of a disposable plastic wasn't a thought because disposable diapers are a product of our modern era.
Now, remember, disposable diapers aren't cheap. The only reason they were bought and used was because the parents were usually travelling or in a position where laundry facilities were limited or not available.
But, a generation came and mommies decided they would rather waste more money than do more laundry. So they began to completely raise their babies through potty training on disposable diapers and the dawn of modern day disposable diaper consumption was born....

Hey, Neutra, is there anything I've said that would give you the idea that a cloth diaper is disposable?
Also, do you get the impression that I know what the difference is between a cloth diaper and a disposable diaper? Further, do you know what the difference between the two is....?
I'm so glad we have this moment to share the same page together because there's something about a person who is so convoluted they actually turn what you say backwards, as you have done.

Neutra wrote:
What you didn't say was how garbage, such as those diapers are collected and refurbished into other materials that help our society today. You know, there's an entire park out here that's made completely out of recycled trash. Children play there daily, it's a skate park, exercise area, events are hosted there, and there are two man-made ponds around it.

And (again) you're right, I didn't mention what those diapers are being recycled into because you fail to mention that industry is out-producing what you're able to recycle.
There are only so many gimmicks you can come up with when it come to parks and recreation (or public work projects for that matter). Going green isn't just a matter of recycling at that level - it's a matter of reverting back to more environmentally friendly textiles such as wood, paper, metal, glass and cloth.

Neutra wrote:
If I list the materials we use here that are from recycled material, we'd be here all day -

- leaving it up to you, this would be true, however, I will take the liberty to simplify this for you, ready?
PLASTIC The end.
Now....how hard is it to imagine plastic in 10,000 different forms? After spending so much time living in a forest, how wise is it to recycle plastic from dump sites only to put it back into the community environment? It makes no sense....

Neutra wrote:
- but my point is anyone can go green, including the people from way back.

Congratulations, you're a crewmember aboard a corporate pirate ship.

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You'll always be Red to me! ...lol

Love, JJ ;-)

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